No more reflux. No more discomfort. No incisions.

Riverside Community Hospital is proud to offer a less invasive solution for heartburn and chronic acid reflux through the innovative and established TIF procedure (Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication). Over twenty million Americans suffer with daily heartburn or other symptoms of reflux such as regurgitation, chronic cough, hoarseness, and chest pain. Until recently, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) sufferers faced either a lifetime of daily medications with often incomplete resolution of their symptoms. Most patients take antacids or medications, watch their diet, and/or make lifestyle changes but they still do not achieve satisfactory relief of their GERD symptoms. Now, Riverside Community Hospital offers a better option, a less invasive effective procedural therapy to help relieve discomfort of GERD symptoms.

What is TIF?

The TIF (Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication) procedure is based on established principles of surgical repair of the anti-reflux barrier. Statistical data from recent randomized controlled and prospective studies showed that 81% of patients were off daily PPI therapy for GERD at 6 months or longer follow up and 78% were off daily PPI at 5 years follow up. In addition, it was reported that 73% and 78% of patients were satisfied with their health condition at 6 months and 5 years follow up respectively after the TIF procedure.

Patients with chronic acid reflux who are not well controlled on PPI Therapy, or want to discontinue medications for their reflux treatment are potential candidates for the TIF procedure. TIF effectively treats the root cause of GERD, a dysfunctional gastro-esophageal junction or GEJ. TIF is done endoscopically under full visualization and enables complete re-construction of the anti-reflux barrier. This allows patients to prevent regurgitation of harmful refluxate back up into the esophagus while still allowing for the venting of air and gases.

TIF takes less than one hour and can also be performed in conjunction with a hiatal hernia repair when necessary. Patients return to normal activity within 3-7 days and follow a special diet for up to 6 weeks while their new valve heals.

Because the TIF procedure is performed endoscopically, there is reduced pain and quick recovery with a low risk of complications such as Gas Bloating Syndrome, inability to belch or vomit, moderate to severe dysphagia (inability to effectively swallow), flatulence and diarrhea.

Patients now feel more comfortable in moving forward with an effective interventional therapy for GERD/Reflux versus a lifetime of potentially harmful medical therapy and exhausting lifestyle changes to accommodate their disease.

What are the benefits of the TIF Procedure to patients?

  • Low risk of complications
  • Minimally Invasive
  • Faster recovery
  • Potential for no Incisions
  • Potential for no visible scars
  • Can be combined with hiatal hernia repair when necessary
  • Restores valve to a natural anatomic state
Contact Riverside Community Hospital at (951) 788-3463 to see if the TIF Procedure is right for you.

What is GERD?

Healthy stomach

Healthy stomach

Stomach with GERD

Stomach with GERD

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic condition in which the gastroesophageal valve (GEV) allows gastric contents to reflux (wash backwards) into the esophagus, causing heartburn and possible injury to the esophageal lining. It is a common disease that affects one in five adults and can be complex to fully diagnose. GERD is the most common gastrointestinal-related diagnosis made by physicians during clinical visits in the U.S.

Many reflux patients are unable to drink alcohol, carbonated beverages, caffeine or eat rich foods or fruit without triggering reflux. They also sleep sitting up to reduce nighttime reflux. For patients suffering from reflux or GERD, they are prescribed escalating doses of prescription medications for prolonged periods of time. While medications can help manage GERD symptoms by suppressing acid production, long-term and high doses of medication has been linked to a host of other health complications.

In addition, the root cause of reflux—a faulty valve between the esophagus and stomach—may still exist.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic condition in which the gastroesophageal valve (GEV) allows gastric contents to reflux (wash backwards) into the esophagus, causing heartburn and possible injury to the esophageal lining. It is a common disease that affects one in five adults and can be complex to fully diagnose. GERD is the most common gastrointestinal-related diagnosis made by physicians during clinical visits in the U.S.

Many reflux patients are unable to drink alcohol, carbonated beverages, caffeine or eat rich foods or fruit without triggering reflux. They also sleep sitting up to reduce nighttime reflux. For patients suffering from reflux or GERD, they are prescribed escalating doses of prescription medications for prolonged periods of time. While medications can help manage GERD symptoms by suppressing acid production, long-term and high doses of medication has been linked to a host of other health complications.

In addition, the root cause of reflux—a faulty valve between the esophagus and stomach—may still exist.